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FIGHTING HATE // TEACHING TOLERANCE // SEEKING JUSTICE
MARCH 11, 2017

Good morning.

Last April, long before Stephen K. Bannon became the chief strategist to President Trump and the architect of one of the president's most draconian executive orders, the SPLC's investigative blog Hatewatch published an analysis of Breitbart News, where Bannon was executive chairman, and its drift to the radical right.

The question that served as our headline "Is Breitbart Becoming the Media Arm of the Alt-Right?" was answered by Bannon himself when he told a Mother Jones reporter in July that Breitbart was, indeed, "the platform for the alt-right."

Our recent research confirmed just how bad it was. Under Bannon, the comment section became infested with anti-Semitic language while their inflammatory coverage of migrants made it the radical right's favorite daily news source.

Last week, The Huffington Post published a major article about Bannon's affection for an obscure and disturbing novel released in 1973 that helped shape his worldview.

The French novel, authored by Jean Raspail, is "The Camp of the Saints," with a subtitle reading "[a] chilling novel about the end of the white world."

Bannon repeatedly referenced the novel on his Breitbart radio show, arguing that the migrant crisis in Europe is exactly what the novel foretold.

"It's not a migration," he said in January 2016. "It's really an invasion. I call it the Camp of the Saints."

As The Huffington Post summarized:

The plot of The Camp of the Saints follows a poor Indian demagogue, named "the turd-eater" because he literally eats s***, and the deformed, apparently psychic child who sits on his shoulders. Together, they lead an "armada" of 800,000 impoverished Indians sailing to France. Dithering European politicians, bureaucrats and religious leaders, including a liberal pope from Latin America, debate whether to let the ships land and accept the Indians or to do the right thing — in the book's vision — by recognizing the threat the migrants pose and killing them all.

One man responsible for promoting the novel throughout the 1990s was John Tanton, the architect of the modern anti-immigrant movement. In 1994, Tanton's Social Contract Press published the novel that featured an afterword by Raspail who wrote:

[T]he proliferation of other races dooms our race, my race, to extinction.

That the right-hand man to President Trump is a fan of this novel should deeply disturb Americans if they aren't already. Linda Chavez, a Republican commentator interviewed by The Huffington Post for the story, said that while she supported some of Trump's economic policies, his immigration policies were "extremely dangerous."

As for Bannon and his affection for this racist novel, Chavez said he "wants to make America white again."

As always, thank you for reading.

The Editors

P.S. Here are a few other articles from this week that we think are worthwhile reads:

Five myths of the private prison industry by Beryl Lipton, MuckRock

In fight over bail's fairness, a sheriff joins the critics by Michael Hardy, The New York Times

The Trump Era: The Politics of Race and Class by Nell Irvin Painter, Princeton Alumni Weekly

When algorithms don't account for civil rights by Gillian B. White, The Atlantic

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